Racial disparity in sentencing

Many people want to believe or pretend that this problem does not exist, and they would rather do nothing to reduce it. Moreover, the problem is significant, and it can be proven. Many researches have been done over the years to prove that the problem of racial disparity in sentencing exists and that it can be reduced by taking proper steps. According to Bruce "racial disparity in the criminal justice system exists when the proportion of a racial or ethnic group within the control of the system is greater than the proportion of such groups in the general population" p.

Racial disparity in sentencing

Racism, an insidious social problem in the United States since the founding of the country, is the belief that members of one or more races are inferior to members of other races.

Racism in the United States has been directed primarily by the white majority against racial and ethnic minorities. The meaning of racial disparity The term racial disparity refers to a difference that may or may not be related to discrimination.

Criminal justice experts distinguish between legal and extralegal factors to explain racial disparities in criminal justice. Legal factors include seriousness of the offense and prior criminal record.

These are legitimate reasons for disparities because they pertain to an individual's criminal behavior.

Racial disparity in sentencing

Extralegal factors include race, class, and gender. These are not legitimate factors upon which to base decisions because they relate to group membership rather than criminal behavior.

Types of racial disparities One type of racial disparity occurs when there is a significant difference between the percentage of a racial group represented in the general population and the percentage of the same group represented at any point in the justice process.

To cite another example, blacks are four times as likely as whites to be arrested on drug charges—even though the two groups use drugs at almost the same rate.

The reasons racial disparities exist Racial disparities in criminal justice are explained in three ways: Their criminality is tied to the fact that these groups suffer from poverty and unemployment.

Second, some of the disparities are due to the bigotry of individual police officers, prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges, probation officers, parole officers, and parole board members.

This individual racism consists of prejudicial beliefs and discriminatory behavior of individual criminal justice authorities against blacks and other minority group members. Third, part of the disparities can be attributed to institutional racism.Prison sentences of black men were nearly 20% longer than those of white men for similar crimes in recent years, an analysis by the U.S.

Sentencing Commission found. 1 Written Submission of the American Civil Liberties Union on Racial Disparities in Sentencing! Hearing on Reports of Racism in the Justice System of the United States. The meaning of racial disparity. The term racial disparity refers to a difference that may or may not be related to discrimination.

Criminal justice experts distinguish between legal and extralegal factors to explain racial disparities in criminal justice. Prison sentences of black men were nearly 20% longer than those of white men for similar crimes in recent years, an analysis by the U.S.

Sentencing Commission found.

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That racial gap has widened. The authors acknowledge the support of the Bureau of Justice Statistics, Award #MU-CX-K Disclaimer: This paper is released to inform interested parties of research and to encourage discussion.

Figure 6 – Variation in racial sentencing disparity across judges for males convicted of non-weapons. abstract. This Article presents new empirical evidence concerning the effects of United States yunusemremert.com, which loosened the formerly mandatory U.S.

Sentencing Guidelines, on racial disparities in federal criminal yunusemremert.com serious limitations pervade existing empirical literature on sentencing disparities.

Racial Gap in Men's Sentencing - WSJ